Hardware Security: Getting Serious

You May Be Surprised at What Crooks Will Try

by Bryon Moyer

There’s the textbook version of the tech business, where hard-working innovators push the edges of technology, bringing ever-more-efficient products into a free market where consumers reward those who best meet consumer needs.

And then there’s the real world, where “innovation” can sometimes mean finding the cleverest ways to cheat.

I mean, yeah, I know that bad guys are out there trying to steal our identities and more. And that shortcuts will always be taken by some. But I have to admit that, as I sat through an ICCAD session on hardware security, the scale of things surprised me.

 

More Indoor Location Services

Few-Centimeter and -Meter Accuracy from BeSpoon and CSR

by Bryon Moyer

We’ve talked before about the challenges of navigating indoors. It was a hard problem then; it remains a hard problem today, with numerous technological contributions coming here and there to help out. For the most part, there’s still no blockbuster new technology to put render all that has come before obsolete, but what follows is a look at a couple of recently-announced real-time location service (RTLS) approaches that continue to build on this pile of solutions.

Be the Spoon

We’ll start with a self-contained proprietary system. In fact, it’s so proprietary that it has its own phone, although, in reality, the phone is more of a development kit than a product. In fact, they announced three such kits a couple of months ago.

 

Instruments for the Black-Turtleneck Crowd

Saleae Logic Analyzer is a New Take on Lab Equipment

by Jim Turley

“Oh, and one more thing…”

You can almost hear the ghost of Steve Jobs introducing the Saleae Logic Pro 16, gesturing to a rear-projection screen as he slips the device out of his pocket. It’s that kind of logic analyzer.

Huh, what? Trendy, stylish, desirable test instruments?

Believe it. The Logic Pro 16 is a hardware logic analyzer that even a design aesthete would love. It’s the lab instrument for the SoHo/Noe Valley/Pearl district crowd. And I have one. And no, you can’t borrow it.

 

Lucio on EDA Investment

Kaufmann Award Winner Shares His Thoughts

by Bryon Moyer

So you’ve been toiling away in the depths of the EDA world and you are struck by an idea of monumental brilliance and potential. You drop what you’re doing and go off into a cave for a while to flesh it out to the point where you can solicit a hearty investment by a forward-thinking manager of an aggressive investment fund.

What are your chances?

It certainly won’t come as a surprise that you’ve got more than one roadblock to get by. It’s not an easy investment environment out there – for high tech in general (at least for anything you can actually put your hands on). Even tougher for EDA.

 

What You Call EDA, I Call IP

EDA Past, Present, and Future with Lucio Lanza

by Amelia Dalton

He's toiled at this project for years - dreamt about it, laid awake at night thinking about it, and even built a lab in his basement to test it. Eventually he brought in friends (from work mostly) to fill in the missing pieces, and before he knew it they really had something. We all know this story. It has played out time and time again. It's the story of the startup, and today's Fish Fry celebrates the men and women who work every day with innovation in their hearts and minds. My distinguished guest is Lucio Lanza, an EDA mentor, venture capitalist, and believer in startup innovation. Lucio is here to explain why funding startups is so crucial in today's EE ecosystem and where he thinks EDA is headed in the future. Also this week, we check out a brand new way to get that semiconductor quote you've been looking for without giving you a headache or breaking your fax machine.

 

electronica 2014

Fifty Years of Electronics in Munich

by Dick Selwood

Electronica, the enormous "trade fair for electronic components, systems, applications and services", to quote the organisers, was nearly a month ago. So why have I waited this long to report on it? Mainly because I needed the time to recover and to try to get a perspective on what I saw and heard during three days packed with meetings interspersed with long walks.

Looking back to the year electronica first took place, 1964 was the year that I Want to Hold Your Hand triggered Beatle-mania (and the Rolling Stones released their first album), US President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, and the US began ramping up the forces in Viet-Nam. In Russia, Khrushchev was deposed as Soviet leader, and, in Britain, Harold Wilson became Prime Minister. China, France and America conducted atom bomb tests, and the second Vatican Council replaced Latin with local languages for Roman Catholic church services. Moog launched his music synthesiser. General Douglas McArthur and Cole Porter both died and Michelle Obama and Sarah Palin were both born. If most of this (except the births) means nothing or little to you, you are probably too young to understand.


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